Alternative Title

Paper No. 2.52 L

Location

St. Louis, Missouri

Session Start Date

3-8-1998

Session End Date

3-15-1998

Abstract

Why do some residential structures slide downhill? This paper illustrates how a residential developer and home builder did not appreciate the geotechnical aspects of developing on a steep hillside, even when the site is within about ¼ mile of a known slide, and previous problems occurred at the site. Due to this indifference, the house in this study was constructed over an apparent previous slide, and destroyed by renewed slope movement. Our study was performed on behalf of the city who maintains both sanitary and storm sewers adjacent to the house. The purpose of our investigation was to determine the most probable cause of the slide, even if it was the sewers. What our study actually showed was the sewers did not cause the slide, but were victims, enabling the city to settle out of court for a fraction of the original claim.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Fourth Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

3-8-1998

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1998 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Mar 8th, 12:00 AM Mar 15th, 12:00 AM

The Tale of Two Slides

St. Louis, Missouri

Why do some residential structures slide downhill? This paper illustrates how a residential developer and home builder did not appreciate the geotechnical aspects of developing on a steep hillside, even when the site is within about ¼ mile of a known slide, and previous problems occurred at the site. Due to this indifference, the house in this study was constructed over an apparent previous slide, and destroyed by renewed slope movement. Our study was performed on behalf of the city who maintains both sanitary and storm sewers adjacent to the house. The purpose of our investigation was to determine the most probable cause of the slide, even if it was the sewers. What our study actually showed was the sewers did not cause the slide, but were victims, enabling the city to settle out of court for a fraction of the original claim.