Alternative Title

Paper No. 2.26

Location

St. Louis, Missouri

Session Start Date

3-8-1998

Session End Date

3-15-1998

Abstract

The record high water during the summer of 1993 significantly impacted the flood control levee structures in the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Kansas City District. Scour holes in the levees and their foundations reached bedrock, up to 75 feet deep in some places, and extended up to 2,000 feet landward of the landside toe on lengths reaching 2,100 feet along selected levee embankments. Different methods used by the Corps of Engineers to repair the scoured levee embankment and foundation soils, their hydraulic impact on river stages, and the efficiency of different methods are presented. The methods discussed consist of: (1) backfill of the riverside scour holes; (2) backfill of the scour hole and reconstruction of the levee embankment to the original centerline; (3) realignment of levees landward of the scour boles; and (4) a grouted cut-off wall in a rockfill embankment and construction of a ring levee around the landside scour hole. The efficiency of different methods was evaluated by observation of the levee system during subsequent flood events.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Fourth Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

3-8-1998

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1998 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Repair of Scour Holes and Levees After the 1993 Flood

St. Louis, Missouri

The record high water during the summer of 1993 significantly impacted the flood control levee structures in the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Kansas City District. Scour holes in the levees and their foundations reached bedrock, up to 75 feet deep in some places, and extended up to 2,000 feet landward of the landside toe on lengths reaching 2,100 feet along selected levee embankments. Different methods used by the Corps of Engineers to repair the scoured levee embankment and foundation soils, their hydraulic impact on river stages, and the efficiency of different methods are presented. The methods discussed consist of: (1) backfill of the riverside scour holes; (2) backfill of the scour hole and reconstruction of the levee embankment to the original centerline; (3) realignment of levees landward of the scour boles; and (4) a grouted cut-off wall in a rockfill embankment and construction of a ring levee around the landside scour hole. The efficiency of different methods was evaluated by observation of the levee system during subsequent flood events.