Alternative Title

Paper No. 2.05

Location

St. Louis, Missouri

Session Start Date

3-8-1998

Session End Date

3-15-1998

Abstract

Wadaslintang Dam, constructed for the Government of Indonesia's Directorate of Irrigation, was completed m 1987 and stands approximately 120 m (394 ft) high at the maximum section with a crest length of about 700 m (2,296 ft). At the time of its completion it was the largest dam ever constructed using the wet core method of construction. Consequently, the project data constitutes a valuable case history of a large dam constructed with a soil core when it was impossible to achieve conventionally accepted standards for placement and compaction of the core zone material. The instrumentation data obtained during construction provides invaluable information on such aspects of behavior as stress distribution m the embankment, pore pressure generation and dissipation, and deformations during construction. Analysis of the data yielded insight and information on a number of aspects relevant to the analysts and design of earth structures, as well as the instrumentation of such structures, and this paper highlights several of the most significant lessons learned from this project. In addition, the project data will contribute to the database of geotechnical information on earth structures constructed in tropical regions of the world.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Fourth Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

3-8-1998

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1998 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Lessons Learned from the Analysis of a Wet Core Dam

St. Louis, Missouri

Wadaslintang Dam, constructed for the Government of Indonesia's Directorate of Irrigation, was completed m 1987 and stands approximately 120 m (394 ft) high at the maximum section with a crest length of about 700 m (2,296 ft). At the time of its completion it was the largest dam ever constructed using the wet core method of construction. Consequently, the project data constitutes a valuable case history of a large dam constructed with a soil core when it was impossible to achieve conventionally accepted standards for placement and compaction of the core zone material. The instrumentation data obtained during construction provides invaluable information on such aspects of behavior as stress distribution m the embankment, pore pressure generation and dissipation, and deformations during construction. Analysis of the data yielded insight and information on a number of aspects relevant to the analysts and design of earth structures, as well as the instrumentation of such structures, and this paper highlights several of the most significant lessons learned from this project. In addition, the project data will contribute to the database of geotechnical information on earth structures constructed in tropical regions of the world.