Alternative Title

Paper No. 1.38

Location

St. Louis, Missouri

Session Start Date

3-8-1998

Session End Date

3-15-1998

Abstract

Presented are the initial support and tic foundation problems of a railroad track built in 1974 to carried axle loads 21% greater than presently (1998) permitted under interchange laws. Described are the concerns related to and affecting the final rehabilitation that resulted in a final satisfactory performance. Of particular interest to the foundation engineer is the ballast, the tie and to a lesser extent the rail behaviour. The use of cobble sized river gravel in the rehabilitation permitted the establishment of guidelines for future use of this source of material where suitable quarried rock is not available. The satisfactory performance after rehabilitation has proven that the design concepts involving 40 ton (36 tonne) axle loads operating on 119 lb/yd (60 kg/m) continuously welded rail, concrete ties and ballast from a river aggregate were achievable.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Fourth Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

3-8-1998

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1998 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Track and Support Rehabilitation 1975 on Black Mesa & Lake Powell Railroad

St. Louis, Missouri

Presented are the initial support and tic foundation problems of a railroad track built in 1974 to carried axle loads 21% greater than presently (1998) permitted under interchange laws. Described are the concerns related to and affecting the final rehabilitation that resulted in a final satisfactory performance. Of particular interest to the foundation engineer is the ballast, the tie and to a lesser extent the rail behaviour. The use of cobble sized river gravel in the rehabilitation permitted the establishment of guidelines for future use of this source of material where suitable quarried rock is not available. The satisfactory performance after rehabilitation has proven that the design concepts involving 40 ton (36 tonne) axle loads operating on 119 lb/yd (60 kg/m) continuously welded rail, concrete ties and ballast from a river aggregate were achievable.