Alternative Title

Paper No. 1.18

Location

St. Louis, Missouri

Session Start Date

3-8-1998

Session End Date

3-15-1998

Abstract

The paper presents a detailed case history of foundation performance of six 60-m diameter, 15-m high, floating roof fuel oil tanks and six 96.8-m diameter, 20-m high, fixed roof process water tanks built for a large power plant. Tank walls were supported by concrete ringwall footings. General subsurface conditions at the site are discussed, along with proposed site grading and the rationale for tank foundation selection. Because vibro-replacement improvement of site soils had been used beneath settlement-sensitive structures, there was skepticism regarding the decision to support the tanks on unimproved soils. To allay doubts about the adequacy of tank foundation performance, a staged hydrotesting procedure and an extensive settlement monitoring program were developed and implemented. The excellent tank hydrotesting results demonstrated that ground improvement was not needed due to the more settlement-tolerant nature of the tanks.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Fourth Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

3-8-1998

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1998 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Mar 8th, 12:00 AM Mar 15th, 12:00 AM

Foundations Performance of Large Diameter Tanks

St. Louis, Missouri

The paper presents a detailed case history of foundation performance of six 60-m diameter, 15-m high, floating roof fuel oil tanks and six 96.8-m diameter, 20-m high, fixed roof process water tanks built for a large power plant. Tank walls were supported by concrete ringwall footings. General subsurface conditions at the site are discussed, along with proposed site grading and the rationale for tank foundation selection. Because vibro-replacement improvement of site soils had been used beneath settlement-sensitive structures, there was skepticism regarding the decision to support the tanks on unimproved soils. To allay doubts about the adequacy of tank foundation performance, a staged hydrotesting procedure and an extensive settlement monitoring program were developed and implemented. The excellent tank hydrotesting results demonstrated that ground improvement was not needed due to the more settlement-tolerant nature of the tanks.