Alternative Title

Paper No. 1.23

Location

St. Louis, Missouri

Session Start Date

3-8-1998

Session End Date

3-15-1998

Abstract

The axial load capacity of individual piles in cohesionless soils can be estimated at design time using a variety of methods. Because of the difficulties in modeling the process of pile driving, set-up, and loading of piles, useful methods are based on case histories a load tests. Perhaps the most common approach in current use is to specify a soil/pile friction angle, an earth pressure coefficient, a tip bearing capacity factor, and appropriate limits on side shear and end bearing. The various parameters may be made functions of soil classification, relative density, depth, or whatever other variables the investigator thinks are important. In this paper, we compare several methods of analysis that have been in wide use, as well as a method based on continuous functions and a newer method developed by Jardine and coworkers, with measured capacities for untapered piles in tension and compression, in cohesion less soils, and try to draw conclusions about the relative merits of the methods.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Fourth Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

3-8-1998

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1998 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Axial Load Capacity of Piles in Sand

St. Louis, Missouri

The axial load capacity of individual piles in cohesionless soils can be estimated at design time using a variety of methods. Because of the difficulties in modeling the process of pile driving, set-up, and loading of piles, useful methods are based on case histories a load tests. Perhaps the most common approach in current use is to specify a soil/pile friction angle, an earth pressure coefficient, a tip bearing capacity factor, and appropriate limits on side shear and end bearing. The various parameters may be made functions of soil classification, relative density, depth, or whatever other variables the investigator thinks are important. In this paper, we compare several methods of analysis that have been in wide use, as well as a method based on continuous functions and a newer method developed by Jardine and coworkers, with measured capacities for untapered piles in tension and compression, in cohesion less soils, and try to draw conclusions about the relative merits of the methods.