Alternative Title

Paper No. SOA-11

Location

St. Louis, Missouri

Session Start Date

3-8-1998

Session End Date

3-15-1998

Abstract

Herein we review the Osterberg Cell, or O-cell, method for performing large capacity load tests on bored piles (drilled shafts), and demonstrate how it provides a new opportunity to assess the effects of construction technique. A sampling of 8 case histories, 7 with comparative testing, illustrates the impact of poor technique and thus demonstrates the importance of good construction technique. The poor techniques include inadequate bottom cleanout, failure to use drilling fluids, poor concrete placement, failure to roughen sides, and improper drilling tools. We conclude with a brief description of a recent, world record, 133 MN (15,000 tons) O-cell load test.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Fourth Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

3-8-1998

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1998 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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O-cell Testings Case Histories Demonstrate the Importance of Bored Pile (Drilled Shaft) Construction Technique

St. Louis, Missouri

Herein we review the Osterberg Cell, or O-cell, method for performing large capacity load tests on bored piles (drilled shafts), and demonstrate how it provides a new opportunity to assess the effects of construction technique. A sampling of 8 case histories, 7 with comparative testing, illustrates the impact of poor technique and thus demonstrates the importance of good construction technique. The poor techniques include inadequate bottom cleanout, failure to use drilling fluids, poor concrete placement, failure to roughen sides, and improper drilling tools. We conclude with a brief description of a recent, world record, 133 MN (15,000 tons) O-cell load test.