Location

St. Louis, Missouri

Session Start Date

6-1-1993

Abstract

The sliding stability failure of the Kettleman Hills waste landfill focused attention on several issues related to the safe design and filling of waste repositories, including low strengths between geosynthetic material interfaces in composite liner systems and low interface strength between compacted clay and smooth geomembranes. Waste placement plans must be carefully developed to insure an adequate factor of safety against sliding at all stages of filling. Because of assumptions and uncertainties that remained following the initial failure investigation, model tests, at a scale of 1:150, were done. These tests reproduced the field failure very well and provided insights into the failure mechanisms. A three-dimensional method for stability analysis gave results in close agreement with field observations and the results of a subsequent detailed failure investigation done by others (Byrne et al., 1992). Those special cases of landfill geometry and liner properties for which the 3D stability may be more critical than that computed using usual 2D methods of analysis could then be determined.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Third Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

6-1-1993

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1993 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

Share

 
COinS
 
Jun 1st, 12:00 AM

The Kettleman Hills Landfill Failure: A Retrospective View of the Failure Investigations and Lessons Learned

St. Louis, Missouri

The sliding stability failure of the Kettleman Hills waste landfill focused attention on several issues related to the safe design and filling of waste repositories, including low strengths between geosynthetic material interfaces in composite liner systems and low interface strength between compacted clay and smooth geomembranes. Waste placement plans must be carefully developed to insure an adequate factor of safety against sliding at all stages of filling. Because of assumptions and uncertainties that remained following the initial failure investigation, model tests, at a scale of 1:150, were done. These tests reproduced the field failure very well and provided insights into the failure mechanisms. A three-dimensional method for stability analysis gave results in close agreement with field observations and the results of a subsequent detailed failure investigation done by others (Byrne et al., 1992). Those special cases of landfill geometry and liner properties for which the 3D stability may be more critical than that computed using usual 2D methods of analysis could then be determined.