Location

St. Louis, Missouri

Session Start Date

6-1-1993

Abstract

Compacted clay liners and covers are widely used in waste containment units. Case histories in three categories are presented: (1) case histories illustrating compaction, construction, and quality assurance difficulties; (2) case histories involving field hydraulic conductivity testing of large-scale test pads; and (3) case histories involving final cover systems. The case histories illustrate that: (1) compaction criteria should be chosen carefully and with consideration given to how the compaction will be controlled in the field; (2) regulatory roadblocks may defeat sound technical approaches in terms of developing compaction criteria; (3) one can follow ASTM procedures and still get into difficulty if sample preparation procedures are not given special attention; ( 4) data on field performance of test pads provides valuable insight concerning the relationship between hydraulic conductivity and field performance; and (5) problems with differential settlement, desiccation, and freeze-thaw make use of compacted clay liners a challenge in final cover systems -- geosynthetic clay liners offer an attractive alternative.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Third Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

6-1-1993

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1993 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Jun 1st, 12:00 AM

Case Histories of Compacted Clay Liners and Covers for Waste Disposal Facilities

St. Louis, Missouri

Compacted clay liners and covers are widely used in waste containment units. Case histories in three categories are presented: (1) case histories illustrating compaction, construction, and quality assurance difficulties; (2) case histories involving field hydraulic conductivity testing of large-scale test pads; and (3) case histories involving final cover systems. The case histories illustrate that: (1) compaction criteria should be chosen carefully and with consideration given to how the compaction will be controlled in the field; (2) regulatory roadblocks may defeat sound technical approaches in terms of developing compaction criteria; (3) one can follow ASTM procedures and still get into difficulty if sample preparation procedures are not given special attention; ( 4) data on field performance of test pads provides valuable insight concerning the relationship between hydraulic conductivity and field performance; and (5) problems with differential settlement, desiccation, and freeze-thaw make use of compacted clay liners a challenge in final cover systems -- geosynthetic clay liners offer an attractive alternative.