Location

St. Louis, Missouri

Session Start Date

6-1-1993

Abstract

The Petrolia, California earthquake (MS 6.9, ML 6.4) occurred on April 25, 1992 and was followed by numerous aftershocks including two earthquakes over magnitude 6 that occurred on April 26, 1992. The earthquakes caused structural damage in Ferndale, Petrolia, Honeydew, Rio Dell, Fortuna, and Scotia. The earthquake also produced ground failures of liquefaction, lateral spreads, and landslides in the epicentral region. Liquefaction did not appear to be widespread, and occurred in locations where it would most likely be expected to occur (low lying areas with very recent alluvial deposits and high ground water). Scattered landslides were triggered by the earthquake sequence throughout the epicentral region of the main shock and within a broad region around it. For an event of this size, the damage was limited by the sparse population, limited development, and depth of the main shock. Other than the liquefaction of a very silty sand, none of the geotechnical consequences were unexpected.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Third Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

6-1-1993

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1993 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Jun 1st, 12:00 AM

Geotechnical Aspects of the Petrolia Earthquake

St. Louis, Missouri

The Petrolia, California earthquake (MS 6.9, ML 6.4) occurred on April 25, 1992 and was followed by numerous aftershocks including two earthquakes over magnitude 6 that occurred on April 26, 1992. The earthquakes caused structural damage in Ferndale, Petrolia, Honeydew, Rio Dell, Fortuna, and Scotia. The earthquake also produced ground failures of liquefaction, lateral spreads, and landslides in the epicentral region. Liquefaction did not appear to be widespread, and occurred in locations where it would most likely be expected to occur (low lying areas with very recent alluvial deposits and high ground water). Scattered landslides were triggered by the earthquake sequence throughout the epicentral region of the main shock and within a broad region around it. For an event of this size, the damage was limited by the sparse population, limited development, and depth of the main shock. Other than the liquefaction of a very silty sand, none of the geotechnical consequences were unexpected.