Location

St. Louis, Missouri

Session Start Date

6-1-1993

Abstract

As part of a new cogeneration plant being built in Jacksonville, Florida, a 31-foot deep excavation was required to install a 173-foot by 53-foot coal unloading structure in loose to medium-dense fine sands with shallow ground water. A conventional system of excavation support would typically consist of installing and maintaining a dewatering system and driving sheet piles. However, due to the potential for shallow contaminated ground water at the site and a restricted amount of inflow treatment capacity, a nearly complete cutoff or "bathtub" structure was required. A system that is relatively new to the United States was designed and installed to meet the difficult needs of the site. The system consisted of a sheet pile perimeter wall placed in a cement-bentonite slurry trench, tied back with soil anchors, in conjunction with an anchored six to eight-foot thick soilcrete base mat installed using jet-grouting techniques. This case history provides details regarding design and installation of the anchored cutoff structure. Specifically, design assumptions regarding lateral earth pressures are presented along with predicted versus actual anchor loads for various construction stages. In addition, the results of finite element seepage analysis of the soilcrete base cutoff, and a unique hydrostatic uplift analysis are also presented.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Third Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

6-1-1993

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1993 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Jun 1st, 12:00 AM

Anchored Cutoff Structure Design and Construction

St. Louis, Missouri

As part of a new cogeneration plant being built in Jacksonville, Florida, a 31-foot deep excavation was required to install a 173-foot by 53-foot coal unloading structure in loose to medium-dense fine sands with shallow ground water. A conventional system of excavation support would typically consist of installing and maintaining a dewatering system and driving sheet piles. However, due to the potential for shallow contaminated ground water at the site and a restricted amount of inflow treatment capacity, a nearly complete cutoff or "bathtub" structure was required. A system that is relatively new to the United States was designed and installed to meet the difficult needs of the site. The system consisted of a sheet pile perimeter wall placed in a cement-bentonite slurry trench, tied back with soil anchors, in conjunction with an anchored six to eight-foot thick soilcrete base mat installed using jet-grouting techniques. This case history provides details regarding design and installation of the anchored cutoff structure. Specifically, design assumptions regarding lateral earth pressures are presented along with predicted versus actual anchor loads for various construction stages. In addition, the results of finite element seepage analysis of the soilcrete base cutoff, and a unique hydrostatic uplift analysis are also presented.