Location

St. Louis, Missouri

Session Start Date

6-1-1993

Abstract

Site geology, subsurface and ground water conditions play a vital role in the design of underground structures and the selection of appropriate construction methods and equipments. This paper describes a tunnel project where site subsoils and geo-hydrology dictated the use of various tunneling methods employed at the site. The project is an interceptor sewer tunnel in Staten Island, New York, as a part of the Oakwood Beach Water Pollution Control Project, and consists of two pumping stations and approximately 6.5 miles of sewer along Hylan Boulevard, as shown on Figure 1. The diameter of the tunnel varies from 66 to 96 inches. The case history presented here covers the construction of the portion of the project designated as contracts 6B2 and 6B3 and describes the site geology and subsurface conditions along the tunnel alignment, criteria used in the selection of various tunneling methods and description and operation of tunneling machines employed at the site.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Third Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

6-1-1993

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1993 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Jun 1st, 12:00 AM

Site Geology and Tunneling Methods

St. Louis, Missouri

Site geology, subsurface and ground water conditions play a vital role in the design of underground structures and the selection of appropriate construction methods and equipments. This paper describes a tunnel project where site subsoils and geo-hydrology dictated the use of various tunneling methods employed at the site. The project is an interceptor sewer tunnel in Staten Island, New York, as a part of the Oakwood Beach Water Pollution Control Project, and consists of two pumping stations and approximately 6.5 miles of sewer along Hylan Boulevard, as shown on Figure 1. The diameter of the tunnel varies from 66 to 96 inches. The case history presented here covers the construction of the portion of the project designated as contracts 6B2 and 6B3 and describes the site geology and subsurface conditions along the tunnel alignment, criteria used in the selection of various tunneling methods and description and operation of tunneling machines employed at the site.