Location

St. Louis, Missouri

Session Start Date

6-1-1993

Abstract

Since its development as a full-fledged soil compaction technique by Louis Menard in the late 1960s, the Dynamic Compaction method has evolved considerably and has become an increasingly efficient ground improvement system. Among the special techniques borne out of this evolution is the use of Dynamic Compaction to create large-diameter columns using select granular material. This method serves to not only provide increased support and better distribution of imposed loads through the columns themselves, but also augments the capability of the process in improving the host soils to a depth and degree not possible using conventional DC methods. Three case histories are presented to illustrate this technique and its benefits in terms of increased effectiveness and range of application.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Third Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

6-1-1993

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1993 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Jun 1st, 12:00 AM

Dynamic Compaction Using Select Fill Displacement Methods

St. Louis, Missouri

Since its development as a full-fledged soil compaction technique by Louis Menard in the late 1960s, the Dynamic Compaction method has evolved considerably and has become an increasingly efficient ground improvement system. Among the special techniques borne out of this evolution is the use of Dynamic Compaction to create large-diameter columns using select granular material. This method serves to not only provide increased support and better distribution of imposed loads through the columns themselves, but also augments the capability of the process in improving the host soils to a depth and degree not possible using conventional DC methods. Three case histories are presented to illustrate this technique and its benefits in terms of increased effectiveness and range of application.