Location

St. Louis, Missouri

Session Start Date

6-1-1993

Abstract

Development over the last 10 years of The Waterways - a 180-acre (73-ha) planned community in North Miami Beach, Florida has advanced the knowledge of constructing low-rise structures and infrastructure over preloaded organic soils, and of supporting high-rise towers on shallow foundations over precompressed loose sand. The experience gained from this project indicates a preconsolidation ratio between 1.7 and 2.0 is appropriate for the preloading of organic soils, and a preload about two times the weight of a high-rise tower is appropriate for precompressing the loose sand. The successful foundation performance of this major development demonstrates that preloading is a reliable and economical site stabilization technique to treat organic soils and deep deposits of loose sand with highly variable engineering properties.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Third Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

6-1-1993

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1993 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Jun 1st, 12:00 AM

Site Stabilization in Hurricane Region

St. Louis, Missouri

Development over the last 10 years of The Waterways - a 180-acre (73-ha) planned community in North Miami Beach, Florida has advanced the knowledge of constructing low-rise structures and infrastructure over preloaded organic soils, and of supporting high-rise towers on shallow foundations over precompressed loose sand. The experience gained from this project indicates a preconsolidation ratio between 1.7 and 2.0 is appropriate for the preloading of organic soils, and a preload about two times the weight of a high-rise tower is appropriate for precompressing the loose sand. The successful foundation performance of this major development demonstrates that preloading is a reliable and economical site stabilization technique to treat organic soils and deep deposits of loose sand with highly variable engineering properties.