Location

St. Louis, Missouri

Session Start Date

6-1-1993

Abstract

Construction of a 23m wide, 57m high, and 210m long underground power house cavern is in progress as a part of the multi-purpose Sardar Sarovar Project in India. The rock mass around the cavern is basalt which is intruded by a number of dolerite dykes. In view of the high side walls of the cavern, and the presence of a 1 to 2m thick shear zone running across the cavern width, a comprehensive approach was worked out for estimation of the wall support requirements. The approach included estimation of the roof support requirements using the four available approaches, and comparison of these requirements with the roof support system actually provided, and established as safe and adequate by the instrumentation data of six years. A favourable comparison established the reliability of the approaches used, and the most reliable of these approaches, i.e., the Barton's approach was then used with confidence for estimation of the wall support requirements.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Third Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

6-1-1993

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1993 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Jun 1st, 12:00 AM

Cavern Wall Support Requirements in a Hydro-Electric Project

St. Louis, Missouri

Construction of a 23m wide, 57m high, and 210m long underground power house cavern is in progress as a part of the multi-purpose Sardar Sarovar Project in India. The rock mass around the cavern is basalt which is intruded by a number of dolerite dykes. In view of the high side walls of the cavern, and the presence of a 1 to 2m thick shear zone running across the cavern width, a comprehensive approach was worked out for estimation of the wall support requirements. The approach included estimation of the roof support requirements using the four available approaches, and comparison of these requirements with the roof support system actually provided, and established as safe and adequate by the instrumentation data of six years. A favourable comparison established the reliability of the approaches used, and the most reliable of these approaches, i.e., the Barton's approach was then used with confidence for estimation of the wall support requirements.