Location

St. Louis, Missouri

Session Start Date

6-1-1993

Abstract

Seismic qualification of large and complex mechanical systems is a tedious task in itself. It not only involves high computational cost, but also becomes cost ineffective in case repeated runs are required from safety considerations. Seismic analysis of one bank of Main PHT System of a typical Nuclear Power Plant has been attempted. Besides analysing the complete system, an attempt has also been made to divide the complete system into logical subsystems and analyse the same for the prescribed seismic loads. The results thus obtained have been compared with those of the complete system and a fairly good degree of agreement has been achieved. The subsystem approach has resulted in substantial reduction of the computational cost.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Third Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

6-1-1993

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1993 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Jun 1st, 12:00 AM

Seismic Qualification of Mechanical Systems

St. Louis, Missouri

Seismic qualification of large and complex mechanical systems is a tedious task in itself. It not only involves high computational cost, but also becomes cost ineffective in case repeated runs are required from safety considerations. Seismic analysis of one bank of Main PHT System of a typical Nuclear Power Plant has been attempted. Besides analysing the complete system, an attempt has also been made to divide the complete system into logical subsystems and analyse the same for the prescribed seismic loads. The results thus obtained have been compared with those of the complete system and a fairly good degree of agreement has been achieved. The subsystem approach has resulted in substantial reduction of the computational cost.