Location

St. Louis, Missouri

Session Start Date

6-1-1993

Abstract

The paper presents case history of a reinforced concrete stadium building which had been structurally designed for a particular component configuration and also constructed upto seating level and which was referred to the author for suggesting structural modifications and redesigning for different configuration which meant curtailing middle two main columns each above the seating level out of four columns in each of left and right halves of the building. The required modifications necessitated analysis of the modified frame under static loads taking into account soil-structure interaction. The other problem to be tackled was ensuring lateral stability with reduced number of main columns, which are slender and have restriction in size, under earthquake conditions. Since the structure could have free vibrations in coupled translation and yawing, advantage has been taken of stiffness of rear columns whose size was not restricted.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Third Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

6-1-1993

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1993 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Jun 1st, 12:00 AM

Soil-Structure Interaction and Aseismic Design of a Stadium Building

St. Louis, Missouri

The paper presents case history of a reinforced concrete stadium building which had been structurally designed for a particular component configuration and also constructed upto seating level and which was referred to the author for suggesting structural modifications and redesigning for different configuration which meant curtailing middle two main columns each above the seating level out of four columns in each of left and right halves of the building. The required modifications necessitated analysis of the modified frame under static loads taking into account soil-structure interaction. The other problem to be tackled was ensuring lateral stability with reduced number of main columns, which are slender and have restriction in size, under earthquake conditions. Since the structure could have free vibrations in coupled translation and yawing, advantage has been taken of stiffness of rear columns whose size was not restricted.