Session Start Date

6-1-1988

Abstract

Ground runs during ml.m.ng of the Papago Freeway Drain Tunnels posed significant potential risk to utilities, street pavement, and buildings located above and adjacent to one of the three tunnel alignments. Ground response to the larger ground runs resulted in open chimneys and settlement of the ground surface of up to several feet. Modifications to the tunneling machine included addition of poling plates and breasting boards. Further modification to the tunneling method included use of compaction grouting in conjunction with mining for the entire length of one tunnel alignment, and use of chemical grouting to prestabilize the ground surrounding the tunnel opening in areas of high risk utilities and in areas where subsurface conditions suggested that running ground would be encountered during mining. This paper presents a summary of the ground behavior with and without the compaction and chemical grouting and describes the grouting methods.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Second Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

6-1-1988

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1988 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

Share

 
COinS
 
Jun 1st, 12:00 AM

Compaction and Chemical Grouting for Drain Tunnels in Phoenix

Ground runs during ml.m.ng of the Papago Freeway Drain Tunnels posed significant potential risk to utilities, street pavement, and buildings located above and adjacent to one of the three tunnel alignments. Ground response to the larger ground runs resulted in open chimneys and settlement of the ground surface of up to several feet. Modifications to the tunneling machine included addition of poling plates and breasting boards. Further modification to the tunneling method included use of compaction grouting in conjunction with mining for the entire length of one tunnel alignment, and use of chemical grouting to prestabilize the ground surrounding the tunnel opening in areas of high risk utilities and in areas where subsurface conditions suggested that running ground would be encountered during mining. This paper presents a summary of the ground behavior with and without the compaction and chemical grouting and describes the grouting methods.