Session Start Date

6-1-1988

Abstract

The first time that the New Austrian Tunnelling Method (NATM) was used for underground works in the Sao Paulo Subway was in 1981. Since that time, significant progress has been achieved in successfully optimizing the support and lowering the construction costs. This paper will describe the latest experience of two single-track parallel tunnels excavated in 1986 through tertiary stiff clay. All the experience accumulated in previous jobs led to design improvements, such as (1) no steel ribs for support along 72% of the tunnels length (2) no temporary invert, and (3) no spiles, forepoles, soil grouting or any other type of ground improvement. Significant cost and time reduction were the practical result. A method for quick and efficient storage and graphical interpretation of instrumentation readings was developed and implemented in a network of microcomputers installed at the construction site, owner's and engineers' offices.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Second Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

6-1-1988

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1988 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Jun 1st, 12:00 AM

Progress in the Use of NATM for the São Paulo Subway

The first time that the New Austrian Tunnelling Method (NATM) was used for underground works in the Sao Paulo Subway was in 1981. Since that time, significant progress has been achieved in successfully optimizing the support and lowering the construction costs. This paper will describe the latest experience of two single-track parallel tunnels excavated in 1986 through tertiary stiff clay. All the experience accumulated in previous jobs led to design improvements, such as (1) no steel ribs for support along 72% of the tunnels length (2) no temporary invert, and (3) no spiles, forepoles, soil grouting or any other type of ground improvement. Significant cost and time reduction were the practical result. A method for quick and efficient storage and graphical interpretation of instrumentation readings was developed and implemented in a network of microcomputers installed at the construction site, owner's and engineers' offices.