Session Start Date

6-1-1988

Abstract

A 1500-m long anchored bulkhead with a height of 20m exhibited a localized failure in the form of broken and overstressed anchors several months after construction. The wall had not yet been subjected to its full design loadings. The soil conditions in the failure area differ from those occurring along the rest of the quay wall by the presence of a very soft silt/clay layer, and during construction the wall had been strengthened in this area. Post-failure analysis of the anchored bulkhead indicated that the primary cause of the failure was overly optimistic design assumptions for the strength of the silt/clay layer and mobilization of passive pressure. The effects of certain construction methods employed and the settlement of the silt/clay were contributing factors in the failure. A relieving platform constructed one year after the failure was designed for the original undrained strength of the silt/clay, without taking into account the effects of soil consolidation and strength gains which had occurred.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Second Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

6-1-1988

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1988 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Jun 1st, 12:00 AM

Anchored Bulkhead Failure on the Arabian Gulf

A 1500-m long anchored bulkhead with a height of 20m exhibited a localized failure in the form of broken and overstressed anchors several months after construction. The wall had not yet been subjected to its full design loadings. The soil conditions in the failure area differ from those occurring along the rest of the quay wall by the presence of a very soft silt/clay layer, and during construction the wall had been strengthened in this area. Post-failure analysis of the anchored bulkhead indicated that the primary cause of the failure was overly optimistic design assumptions for the strength of the silt/clay layer and mobilization of passive pressure. The effects of certain construction methods employed and the settlement of the silt/clay were contributing factors in the failure. A relieving platform constructed one year after the failure was designed for the original undrained strength of the silt/clay, without taking into account the effects of soil consolidation and strength gains which had occurred.