Session Start Date

6-1-1988

Abstract

The stability of large metal culverts depends on the performance of the backfill around the pipe, which must be considered as a part of the structure when evaluating its safety. A simplified method to evaluate the current stability of such a structure on the basis of the structure's shape is derived. Useful when limited amount of information is available, this method provides an economical procedure for: (1) evaluating the condition of the existing backfill and its capability to provide a safe support for the structure; (2) predicting final movements and determining if additional investigations are necessary to establish the safety of the structure; and (3) determining if measured deflections are in agreement with those predicted and, if not, determining if the safety of the structure is endangered by phenomena other than the expected behavior of surrounding soil (e.g. voids near pipe, soil erosion, non-symmetric loadings).

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Second Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

6-1-1988

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1988 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Jun 1st, 12:00 AM

Actual and Predicted Behavior of Large Metal Culverts

The stability of large metal culverts depends on the performance of the backfill around the pipe, which must be considered as a part of the structure when evaluating its safety. A simplified method to evaluate the current stability of such a structure on the basis of the structure's shape is derived. Useful when limited amount of information is available, this method provides an economical procedure for: (1) evaluating the condition of the existing backfill and its capability to provide a safe support for the structure; (2) predicting final movements and determining if additional investigations are necessary to establish the safety of the structure; and (3) determining if measured deflections are in agreement with those predicted and, if not, determining if the safety of the structure is endangered by phenomena other than the expected behavior of surrounding soil (e.g. voids near pipe, soil erosion, non-symmetric loadings).