Session Start Date

6-1-1988

Abstract

In this paper, two case records are presented as an illustration of the advantages of using what one might call "common sense" foundation design. The first case is an illustrative example of the detrimental effects on older buildings that can be caused by traditional piling in non-cohesive soil. The possibilities of avoiding damage by application of a less rigid foundation design method are discussed. Thus, having access to more sophisticated soil investigation methods than those originally used, it can be shown that a mixed foundation, partly on settlement reducing piles and partly on shallow footings would have been possible. The concept of settlement reducing piles means that the length and number of piles in the pile groups are chosen with a view to eliminating settlement differences between piled and unpiled foundations. Using this solution, the part of the new building nearest to the older ones would have been founded on shallow footings, which would have meant both a considerable reduction of damage to the older buildings and considerable savings in foundation costs. The second case record is presented in support of the design method suggested. The subsoil conditions under the building in this case are very similar to those in the first case. Here, on the basis of more developed soil investigations methods, it was decided to found the building partly on settlement reducing piles and partly on shallow footings. To keep a check on the result, the building was monitored with settlement gauges. The results of the settlement observations showed excellent agreement between prediction and performance.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Second Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

6-1-1988

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1988 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Jun 1st, 12:00 AM

Common-Sense Foundation Design

In this paper, two case records are presented as an illustration of the advantages of using what one might call "common sense" foundation design. The first case is an illustrative example of the detrimental effects on older buildings that can be caused by traditional piling in non-cohesive soil. The possibilities of avoiding damage by application of a less rigid foundation design method are discussed. Thus, having access to more sophisticated soil investigation methods than those originally used, it can be shown that a mixed foundation, partly on settlement reducing piles and partly on shallow footings would have been possible. The concept of settlement reducing piles means that the length and number of piles in the pile groups are chosen with a view to eliminating settlement differences between piled and unpiled foundations. Using this solution, the part of the new building nearest to the older ones would have been founded on shallow footings, which would have meant both a considerable reduction of damage to the older buildings and considerable savings in foundation costs. The second case record is presented in support of the design method suggested. The subsoil conditions under the building in this case are very similar to those in the first case. Here, on the basis of more developed soil investigations methods, it was decided to found the building partly on settlement reducing piles and partly on shallow footings. To keep a check on the result, the building was monitored with settlement gauges. The results of the settlement observations showed excellent agreement between prediction and performance.