Session Start Date

6-1-1988

Abstract

The Charleston, South Carolina earthquake of August 31, 1886 produced numerous liquefaction features. To date, over one hundred liquefaction sites have been identified. The characteristics of these sites were determined, and compared to those reported for worldwide cases of liquefaction. The findings of this investigation support the generally accepted models for the types of material and the hydrogeologic setting that are required for liquefaction to occur. However in contrast to some previous studies, these investigations identified relatively few liquefaction sites in Late Holocene sediments. Rather, most liquefaction sites identified in the Charleston area are located in deposits that are 100,000 to 200,000 years old. Finally, this study indicates that the depositional environment plays a key role in determining the type of liquefaction failure.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Second Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

6-1-1988

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1988 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Jun 1st, 12:00 AM

Characterization of Liquefaction Sites/Features in the Charleston, S. C. Area

The Charleston, South Carolina earthquake of August 31, 1886 produced numerous liquefaction features. To date, over one hundred liquefaction sites have been identified. The characteristics of these sites were determined, and compared to those reported for worldwide cases of liquefaction. The findings of this investigation support the generally accepted models for the types of material and the hydrogeologic setting that are required for liquefaction to occur. However in contrast to some previous studies, these investigations identified relatively few liquefaction sites in Late Holocene sediments. Rather, most liquefaction sites identified in the Charleston area are located in deposits that are 100,000 to 200,000 years old. Finally, this study indicates that the depositional environment plays a key role in determining the type of liquefaction failure.