Session Start Date

6-1-1988

Abstract

Big Lagoon, located 30 miles north of Eureka, California is formed behind a bay barrier built across the mouth of a drowned river valley. To the south of the bay the beach follows rising wave cut slightly cemented sand and gravel sea cliffs and terminates at the south end of Agate Beach. The retreat of these sea cliffs and its effect on property development along the top of the cliff is the focus of the paper. Measurements of bluff retreat in this area have been documented extensively from November 1941 to March 1986 through ground surveys and air photos. Review of the data indicates that the retreat rate is not constant along the cliff but has either been decreasing or remaining the same over the last 45 years. Using information on the rate of retreat, a method is developed to predict the cliff erosion in the future.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Second Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

6-1-1988

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1988 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

Share

 
COinS
 
Jun 1st, 12:00 AM

Coastal Bluff Retreat at Big Lagoon, California

Big Lagoon, located 30 miles north of Eureka, California is formed behind a bay barrier built across the mouth of a drowned river valley. To the south of the bay the beach follows rising wave cut slightly cemented sand and gravel sea cliffs and terminates at the south end of Agate Beach. The retreat of these sea cliffs and its effect on property development along the top of the cliff is the focus of the paper. Measurements of bluff retreat in this area have been documented extensively from November 1941 to March 1986 through ground surveys and air photos. Review of the data indicates that the retreat rate is not constant along the cliff but has either been decreasing or remaining the same over the last 45 years. Using information on the rate of retreat, a method is developed to predict the cliff erosion in the future.