Session Start Date

6-1-1988

Abstract

The construction of the Great Salt Lake Causeway involved several calculated risks. Original design assumptions on lake level and consolidation settlement were not realized, creating a unique situation where the critical time for stability of this embankment was not necessarily at the end-of-construction. Along more than half of the causeway's 12-1/2 mile length, consolidation and strength gain has apparently been inhibited by a layer of salt. Because it was anticipated that calculated Factors of Safety for current conditions would be close to the 1.0 originally used, a comparative approach to stability evaluations was adopted. In this approach, Factors of Safety calculated for known, past stable conditions were compared with those predicted for future conditions. Judgements of future Causeway stability were made by comparing Factors of Safety with time. The presence of a salt layer in the foundation of a portion of the Causeway's length renders exact solution of stability intractable to usual analytical procedures.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Second Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

6-1-1988

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1988 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Jun 1st, 12:00 AM

The Great Salt Lake Causeway – A Calculated Risk Revisited

The construction of the Great Salt Lake Causeway involved several calculated risks. Original design assumptions on lake level and consolidation settlement were not realized, creating a unique situation where the critical time for stability of this embankment was not necessarily at the end-of-construction. Along more than half of the causeway's 12-1/2 mile length, consolidation and strength gain has apparently been inhibited by a layer of salt. Because it was anticipated that calculated Factors of Safety for current conditions would be close to the 1.0 originally used, a comparative approach to stability evaluations was adopted. In this approach, Factors of Safety calculated for known, past stable conditions were compared with those predicted for future conditions. Judgements of future Causeway stability were made by comparing Factors of Safety with time. The presence of a salt layer in the foundation of a portion of the Causeway's length renders exact solution of stability intractable to usual analytical procedures.