Session Start Date

6-1-1988

Abstract

This paper presents key features of the Highland Valley tailings storage facility comprising two tailings dams, a 107 m high H-H Dam and a 166 m high L-L Dam. The construction history to date including instrumentation observations is also reviewed. Although the tailings facility is situated in a low to moderate seismic area within the Interior Plateau of British Columbia, potential earthquake sources that might have an impact on the site have been carefully assessed. Both dams are designed to have adequate seismic resistance against design earthquakes appropriate for the site. The L-L Dam valley section, involving soft lacustrine deposits beneath the Starter Dam, has been buttressed by a compacted downstream berm founded on dense glacial till. As the geometry of the tailings storage and distribution facilities and waste dumps changes with time, the quantity and relative cost of various construction materials including natural borrow, cycloned sand and pit overburden also change. Ongoing construction is planned to maintain key earthquake and flood design criteria as well as to adjust the use and placement method of various materials to achieve an efficient and cost effective tailings storage operation. Inherent in the design of the two tailings dams, both constructed by the centerline method, is the flexibility which enables the storage capacity of the tailings facility to be increased beyond the present 1.8 billion tonnes if required at some future time.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Second Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

6-1-1988

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1988 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Jun 1st, 12:00 AM

Overview of Highland Valley Tailings Storage Facility

This paper presents key features of the Highland Valley tailings storage facility comprising two tailings dams, a 107 m high H-H Dam and a 166 m high L-L Dam. The construction history to date including instrumentation observations is also reviewed. Although the tailings facility is situated in a low to moderate seismic area within the Interior Plateau of British Columbia, potential earthquake sources that might have an impact on the site have been carefully assessed. Both dams are designed to have adequate seismic resistance against design earthquakes appropriate for the site. The L-L Dam valley section, involving soft lacustrine deposits beneath the Starter Dam, has been buttressed by a compacted downstream berm founded on dense glacial till. As the geometry of the tailings storage and distribution facilities and waste dumps changes with time, the quantity and relative cost of various construction materials including natural borrow, cycloned sand and pit overburden also change. Ongoing construction is planned to maintain key earthquake and flood design criteria as well as to adjust the use and placement method of various materials to achieve an efficient and cost effective tailings storage operation. Inherent in the design of the two tailings dams, both constructed by the centerline method, is the flexibility which enables the storage capacity of the tailings facility to be increased beyond the present 1.8 billion tonnes if required at some future time.