Session Start Date

6-1-1988

Abstract

The piping failure of the Senekal dam and many other small dams in South Africa, despite the use of apparently sound material and good control during construction, emphasizes the need for a method to unambiguously identify dispersive soils. Physical and chemical tests of one hundred and seventy soil samples were evaluated against the double hydrometer method, after removal of free salts. The chemical methods based on characterization of the exchange complex (CEC and ESP) gave consistently more reliable results than the physical tests, such as the pinhole, crumb and sticky point tests and even the double hydrometer test when free salts are not removed.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Second Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

6-1-1988

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1988 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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A Proposed Procedure for the Identification of Dispersive Soils

The piping failure of the Senekal dam and many other small dams in South Africa, despite the use of apparently sound material and good control during construction, emphasizes the need for a method to unambiguously identify dispersive soils. Physical and chemical tests of one hundred and seventy soil samples were evaluated against the double hydrometer method, after removal of free salts. The chemical methods based on characterization of the exchange complex (CEC and ESP) gave consistently more reliable results than the physical tests, such as the pinhole, crumb and sticky point tests and even the double hydrometer test when free salts are not removed.