Session Start Date

6-1-1988

Abstract

The containment dikes of two sludge disposal lagoons were founded on low strength, highly compressible wetland soils in Madison, Wisconsin. These lagoons, constructed in 1942 and 1967 respectively, encompass 130 acres of digested sludge produced at the sewage treatment plant. The dikes have experienced two previous failures in 1970 and 1973. A dike rehabilitation program was initiated in 1976 to prevent additional failures. New dikes were built using wood chips as a lightweight fill. Non-woven synthetic filter fabric was used to prevent soil intrusion into the chips and to provide resistance to lateral spreading. An investigation was initiated in 1984 to assess the current and long term stability and settlement of the dikes, to determine the fate of the wood chip fill, and to develop recommendations for ways to stabilize the dikes, if necessary. This paper presents the results of the stability and settlement analyses, and the attendant interpretations. The investigation indicated better than marginal stability, predicted minor loss of freeboard between 1987 and the year 2000, and found only minor changes in the wood chips after 10 years of service.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Second Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

6-1-1988

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1988 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Performance of Lightweight Waste-Impoundment Dikes

The containment dikes of two sludge disposal lagoons were founded on low strength, highly compressible wetland soils in Madison, Wisconsin. These lagoons, constructed in 1942 and 1967 respectively, encompass 130 acres of digested sludge produced at the sewage treatment plant. The dikes have experienced two previous failures in 1970 and 1973. A dike rehabilitation program was initiated in 1976 to prevent additional failures. New dikes were built using wood chips as a lightweight fill. Non-woven synthetic filter fabric was used to prevent soil intrusion into the chips and to provide resistance to lateral spreading. An investigation was initiated in 1984 to assess the current and long term stability and settlement of the dikes, to determine the fate of the wood chip fill, and to develop recommendations for ways to stabilize the dikes, if necessary. This paper presents the results of the stability and settlement analyses, and the attendant interpretations. The investigation indicated better than marginal stability, predicted minor loss of freeboard between 1987 and the year 2000, and found only minor changes in the wood chips after 10 years of service.