Session Start Date

5-6-1984

Abstract

This paper presents a case study of a dynamic compaction ("pounding") project, undertaken in Skokie, Illinois. The purpose was to densify a 50-ft deep former municipal waste landfill for support of a one-story warehouse structure on shallow foundations. The majority of the pounding was performed utilizing a 15-ton weight falling from a height of 60 ft. In some areas, lower energy levels were used for surface compaction. All phases of the project are discussed, beginning with the subsurface exploration program and geotechnical analysis, through the experimental test pounding section, and the final check borings to observe that the "production" pounding was successful. A follow-up of the performance of the pounding, by monitoring foundation settlements, is discussed, as are topics such as depth of improvement, offsite vibrations, and energy input.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

First Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

5-6-1984

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1984 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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May 6th, 12:00 AM

Densifying a Landfill for Commercial Development

This paper presents a case study of a dynamic compaction ("pounding") project, undertaken in Skokie, Illinois. The purpose was to densify a 50-ft deep former municipal waste landfill for support of a one-story warehouse structure on shallow foundations. The majority of the pounding was performed utilizing a 15-ton weight falling from a height of 60 ft. In some areas, lower energy levels were used for surface compaction. All phases of the project are discussed, beginning with the subsurface exploration program and geotechnical analysis, through the experimental test pounding section, and the final check borings to observe that the "production" pounding was successful. A follow-up of the performance of the pounding, by monitoring foundation settlements, is discussed, as are topics such as depth of improvement, offsite vibrations, and energy input.