Session Start Date

5-6-1984

Abstract

For the benefit of those readers not fully conversant with mine tailings and the methods commonly used to store them, the paper presents a brief overview covering the composition of tailings and the procedures commonly used to design and construct the required tailings dams. The remainder of the paper presents a detailed description of the design, construction, and performance of the Brenda Cycloned-Sand Tailings Dam. This includes a summary and assessment of the large volume of data available from extensive field, laboratory, and office studies that have been ongoing since the start of construction in 1968. The most recent of these studies (1980-83) involved "state-of-the-art" seismic analyses to determine if the original dam could be raised to an ultimate height of 530 ft and remain stable under the maximum credible earthquake for the site.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

First Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

5-6-1984

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1984 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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May 6th, 12:00 AM

The Brenda Mines' Cycloned- Sand Tailings Dam

For the benefit of those readers not fully conversant with mine tailings and the methods commonly used to store them, the paper presents a brief overview covering the composition of tailings and the procedures commonly used to design and construct the required tailings dams. The remainder of the paper presents a detailed description of the design, construction, and performance of the Brenda Cycloned-Sand Tailings Dam. This includes a summary and assessment of the large volume of data available from extensive field, laboratory, and office studies that have been ongoing since the start of construction in 1968. The most recent of these studies (1980-83) involved "state-of-the-art" seismic analyses to determine if the original dam could be raised to an ultimate height of 530 ft and remain stable under the maximum credible earthquake for the site.