Session Start Date

5-6-1984

Abstract

The growing recognition of mining subsidence and its effects has provoked numerous investigations into the modeling and prediction of this phenomenon. Through an analysis of case histories and examination of the various modeling techniques, it has become apparent that empirical studies currently represent the most realistic approach to this problem. However, the collection, analysis and interpretation of subsidence and strain data acquired from case studies presents substantial difficulties, due to varying monitoring techniques and methods of analysis. In this paper it is suggested that a prescribed monitoring program could eliminate these problems and ensure quality data by standardizing the measurement process. Such an effort may also increase the number of case studies available for analysis, allowing more intense investigations of subsidence prediction methods. Finally, some basic subsidence relationships developed from the established subsidence data bank on longwall and room and pillar mines in Appalachia are discussed in detail. These relationships may provide important information on the characteristics of ground movements above mined areas and thus greatly facilitate engineering design under these conditions.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

First Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

5-6-1984

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1984 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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May 6th, 12:00 AM

Ground Movement Characteristics above Mined Panels in Appalachia-an Empirical Approach

The growing recognition of mining subsidence and its effects has provoked numerous investigations into the modeling and prediction of this phenomenon. Through an analysis of case histories and examination of the various modeling techniques, it has become apparent that empirical studies currently represent the most realistic approach to this problem. However, the collection, analysis and interpretation of subsidence and strain data acquired from case studies presents substantial difficulties, due to varying monitoring techniques and methods of analysis. In this paper it is suggested that a prescribed monitoring program could eliminate these problems and ensure quality data by standardizing the measurement process. Such an effort may also increase the number of case studies available for analysis, allowing more intense investigations of subsidence prediction methods. Finally, some basic subsidence relationships developed from the established subsidence data bank on longwall and room and pillar mines in Appalachia are discussed in detail. These relationships may provide important information on the characteristics of ground movements above mined areas and thus greatly facilitate engineering design under these conditions.