Session Start Date

5-6-1984

Abstract

In a Compressor foundation undergoing excessive vibrations, its amplitudes at operating frequency and natural frequency in free vibrations were monitored. Also in-situ dynamic properties were determined to check design and predict its response. Since the soil constants are strain depondent, two sets of computations were done (1) from the known soil constants and permissible amplitudes and (2) from the known soil constants and the observed amplitudes. The soil constants were corrected for confining pressure and relative density of the non-cohesive soil also. Both weightless spring theory (Barkans’ Method) and elastic half space theory were used in predicting the response. A critical evaluation of these two design approaches has been made and necessity to monitor the performance of machine foundations is highlighted.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

First Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

5-6-1984

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1984 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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May 6th, 12:00 AM

Behavior of Compressor Foundation – Predictions and Observations

In a Compressor foundation undergoing excessive vibrations, its amplitudes at operating frequency and natural frequency in free vibrations were monitored. Also in-situ dynamic properties were determined to check design and predict its response. Since the soil constants are strain depondent, two sets of computations were done (1) from the known soil constants and permissible amplitudes and (2) from the known soil constants and the observed amplitudes. The soil constants were corrected for confining pressure and relative density of the non-cohesive soil also. Both weightless spring theory (Barkans’ Method) and elastic half space theory were used in predicting the response. A critical evaluation of these two design approaches has been made and necessity to monitor the performance of machine foundations is highlighted.