Session Start Date

5-6-1984

Abstract

Open pit mining generally involves moving large quantities of waste rock to disposal areas which are usually located near the mine. This waste rock must be disposed of in a safe, economical, and environmentally acceptable manner. The stability of the waste dump depends to a great extent on the physical properties of the underlying foundation. Information must be obtained to define and assess the strength, consolidation, distribution, topographic and hydrogeologic properties for the foundation materials. Methods for obtaining estimates of the material properties include: laboratory and field testing, back analysis, and indirect estimates from other material properties. Mining operations in mountainous terrain generally necessitate development of waste rock dumps on areas of moderate to steeply sloping terrain. The design and monitoring of these waste embankments are an integral part of the mine planning function, and present a challenge to the geotechnical engineer. Close coordination with mining operations is also required to ensure proper dump construction. Described is a case history of a large scale rail dump settlement episode which extended over an area of approximately 20 acres. Boundary and crest tension cracks closely followed original drainage topography leading to the belief that displacements were foundation soil (clay) related. Active and passive blocks were distinctly exhibited. Concentrated dumping with attendant foundation pore pressure buildup were principal causes for the settlement.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

First Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

5-6-1984

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1984 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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May 6th, 12:00 AM

Open Pit Mine Rock Dump Geotechnical Evaluation

Open pit mining generally involves moving large quantities of waste rock to disposal areas which are usually located near the mine. This waste rock must be disposed of in a safe, economical, and environmentally acceptable manner. The stability of the waste dump depends to a great extent on the physical properties of the underlying foundation. Information must be obtained to define and assess the strength, consolidation, distribution, topographic and hydrogeologic properties for the foundation materials. Methods for obtaining estimates of the material properties include: laboratory and field testing, back analysis, and indirect estimates from other material properties. Mining operations in mountainous terrain generally necessitate development of waste rock dumps on areas of moderate to steeply sloping terrain. The design and monitoring of these waste embankments are an integral part of the mine planning function, and present a challenge to the geotechnical engineer. Close coordination with mining operations is also required to ensure proper dump construction. Described is a case history of a large scale rail dump settlement episode which extended over an area of approximately 20 acres. Boundary and crest tension cracks closely followed original drainage topography leading to the belief that displacements were foundation soil (clay) related. Active and passive blocks were distinctly exhibited. Concentrated dumping with attendant foundation pore pressure buildup were principal causes for the settlement.