Abstract

The Keraf Suture, formed during the Neoproterozoic consolidation of Gondwana, is a ~500 km long, ~50 km wide, N-trending suture between the Neoproterozoic Arabian-Nubian Shield in the east and the older Nile Craton to the west. The Keraf Suture is superimposed on E- and NE-trending structures on both sides. The northern part of the suture is dominated by N-trending, upright folds, whereas the southern part is characterized by N- and NNW-trending, sinistral, strike-slip faults. A major antiform defines a structural divide between the northern and southern parts of the suture. 40Ar/39Ar ages on biotite and hornblendes separated from a deformed granitic body indicate that the sinistral movement along the N- and NNW-trending faults took place at ~580 Ma. The difference in structural styles along strike is due to formation of the Keraf Suture by sinistral transpression, which accompanied early NW-SE oblique collision between East and West Gondwana at ~650-600 Ma and terminal collision at ~580 Ma.

Department(s)

Geosciences and Geological and Petroleum Engineering

Geographic Coverage

Sudan

Time Period

Neoproterozoic

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

0022-1376

Document Type

Article - Journal

Document Version

Final Version

File Type

text

Language(s)

English

Rights

© 1998 University of Chicago Press, All rights reserved.

Included in

Geology Commons

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