Title

One Homogeneous People: Narratives of White Southern Identity, 1890-1920

Abstract

Southerners have a reputation as storytellers, as a people fond of telling about family, community, and the southern way of life. A compelling book about some of those stories and their consequences, One Homogeneous People examines the forging and the embracing of southern “pan-whiteness” as an ideal during the volatile years surrounding the turn of the twentieth century. Trent Watts argues that despite real and significant divisions within the South along lines of religion, class, and ethnicity, white southerners--especially in moments of perceived danger--asserted that they were one people bound by a shared history, a love of family, home, and community, and an uncompromising belief in white supremacy. Watts explores how these southerners explained their region and its people to themselves and other Americans through narratives found in a variety of forms and contexts: political oratory, fiction, historiography, journalism, correspondence, literary criticism, and the built environment.

Department(s)

English and Technical Communication

Comments

Author published as Trent Watts.

Library of Congress Subject Headings

Southern States: Civilization
Whites: Race identity: Southern States: History
Group identity: Southern States: History
Race awareness: Southern States: History

Time Period

1890 - 1920

International Standard Book Number (ISBN)

9781572335035

Electronic OCLC #

699519523

Print OCLC #

609304942

Document Type

Book

Document Version

Citation

File Type

text

Language(s)

English

Rights

© 2010 University of Tennessee Press, All rights reserved.


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