Doctoral Dissertations

Abstract

"The formation of an explosion crater is a highly complex process. All of the pertinent parameters governing the mechanisms of cratering are not clearly understood or known. Many cratering experiments were performed in desert alluvium in an effort to relate crater dimensions with charge weight and depth of burst. Various scaling laws were devised in an attempt to correlate the data gathered from these experiments. When cube-root scaling was used to correlate results of tests conducted at a constant scaled depth of burst, larger charge weights consistently gave smaller scaled results. This was particularly true of apparent crater volume. When gravity scaling was used this trend was less evident.

A mathematical ballistic model of the ejecta process was derived and used to show that theoretically the scaled ejecta volume decreases in the same manner as the scaled apparent crater volume when true crater dimensions are increased in accordance with the cube-root scaling law while gravity and particle velocity are held constant.

On the basis of this investigation it was concluded that the inability to scale gravity in field experiments accounts for the systematic deviation of scaled apparent crater volumes from the cube-root law"--Abstract, page ii.

Advisor(s)

Clark, George Bromley, 1912-

Department(s)

Mining and Nuclear Engineering

Degree Name

Ph. D. in Mining Engineering

Publisher

University of Missouri at Rolla

Publication Date

1966

Pagination

vii, 74 pages

Note about bibliography

Includes bibliographical references (pages 65-66).

Rights

© 1966 William James Karwoski, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Dissertation - Open Access

File Type

text

Language

English

Library of Congress Subject Headings

Cratering
Cratering -- Mathematical models
Blast effect -- Measurement

Thesis Number

T 1851

Print OCLC #

5973141

Electronic OCLC #

895203763

Comments

George B. Clark, Dissertation Supervisor

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