Bachelors Theses

Abstract

"The ordinary methods of determining the true meridian by observation on either Polaris or the sun are so tedious to calculate that most surveyors and students dread making them. Observation on Polaris at either elongation or clumination sic require less calculation and are much simpler, but this simplicity is offset by the fact that they must be taken at an exact instant. If a cloud crosses the sky at the time, the surveyor has to wait until the next night. then again the observer must know the date, exact longitude and latitude and correct time for making the observation, and these are not always known in the field. The method described herein was suggested by Professor Harris. Briefly, it consists of taking a complete sunset to sunrise set of observations of the total angle between Urser Minor Polaris and Urser Minor B Beta and the corresponding angle between Polaris and the known true meridian"--Introduction, page 3.

Advisor(s)

Harris, Elmo Golightly, 1861-1944

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Degree Name

B.S. in Civil Engineering

Publisher

Missouri School of Mines and Metallurgy

Publication Date

1917

Pagination

i, 37 pages, 2 plates

Note about bibliography

Includes bibliographical references (page 27).

Rights

© 1917 Howard J. Teas, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Thesis - Open Access

File Type

text

Language

English

Library of Congress Subject Headings

Meridians (Astronomy)
Meridians (Geodesy)
Surveying -- Instruments

Thesis Number

T 488

Print OCLC #

5955405

Electronic OCLC #

320476046

Comments

Illustrated by author.
Howard J. Teas determined to be Howard Jones Teas from "1874-1999 MSM-UMR Alumni Directory".

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