Abstract

Whereas right-libertarians do not think that it is a requirement of justice that we raise revenues for persons with disabilities, both left-libertarians and liberal egalitarians think that there is such a requirement. An issue remains for the latter two theorists—how ought we to raise this revenue? Liberal egalitarians typically endorse either universal taxation or taxation of the wealthy. Left-libertarians, on the other hand, cannot so easily appeal to the methods of universal taxation and taxation of the wealthy, as they are illegitimately coercive. One such method left open to the left-libertarian is one proposed by Michael Otsuka. He argues that both left-libertarians and liberal egalitarians should find the method of taxation of the unjust to be a reasonably strong way of raising revenue. In this paper, I point out problems with Otsuka’s argument, as well as directly criticize the method of taxation of the unjust.

Department(s)

Arts, Languages, and Philosophy

Keywords and Phrases

Alternative methods to universal taxation; Charity; Left-libertarianism; Liberal egalitarianism; Michael Otsuka; Persons with disabilities; Right-libertarianism; Taxation of the unjust; Taxation of the wealthy; Universal taxation

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

1356-4765

Document Type

Article - Journal

Document Version

Final Version

File Type

text

Language(s)

English

Rights

© 2005 Springer, All rights reserved.

Included in

Philosophy Commons

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